Tag Archives: mobile web

GoWallet Forgets That It’s A Mobile App

I was standing in line at the grocery store the other day, loyalty card in-hand, when I saw an image of a mobile phone on a nearby display. On it was printed, “Access Your Gift Cards – anytime, anywhere” (I’m really tired of companies who have anything at all to do with mobile using ‘anytime, anywhere’. In this case, there’s a picture of a mobile phone. I get it.) Then there was a picture of a phone with a few logos on the screen such as Best Buy and Safeway (the store in which I was standing). At first I thought it was suggesting I could load my Safeway card onto the phone, probably because I was actually holding my card.

image: MobileMarketingFail.com GoWallet Display

I was going to try it (or at least get the app – I didn’t have any gift cards at the time) and impulsively reached for my phone to scan the QR code. But in a brief moment of disbelief that quickly turned into disappointment I found no code to scan.  There was a URL for gowallet.com but it was my turn in line and I had to pay for my things.  I had enough time to scan a code and that was it.

FAIL

After checking out I looked for an empty check-out isle and found the same sign. I opened the browser on my phone and tapped in gowallet.com. After several seconds and a bit of forced patience (is it that hard to make a mobile site that loads fast?) I was offered the following on my screen:

image: mobilemarketingfail.com GoWallet site

 

Eh? This can’t be happening. This is a full web site! What am I supposed to do with this? Arrrgh..

FAIL

******************************

What could have saved this experience/campaign?

This multi-level fail needs a lot of work to make it a good mobile experience. It’s surprising that a service that has mobile at its heart is so un-friendly to the mobile user. Let’s start at the top.

1) Call-to-Action – Even with the questions about the long-term viability of QR codes this would have been the place to have one.  For those who know what to do with a QR code it is simply the fastest way to create a connection with the mobile user.  Just putting the URL is not enough. Opening a browser and tapping in URL - even a relatively simple one - is not as fast as scanning a 2D barcode.

2) Mobile Web – The GoWallet web site, whether someone tapped or scanned to get there,  MUST be made mobile-friendly. If for some reason the site can’t be made friendly at least create a landing page that briefly describes the service and allows the mobile user to easily show some initial interest (no-one will complete registration from their phone) by entering their email address or linking to a download of the mobile app.

3) Promote the App – Using basic device detection it is relatively simple to re-direct mobile phones to the mobile app in the appropriate app store. Then, tell them more about the app and the overall service once they are there and only one tap away from a download. Don’t make mobile users read a detailed web site and then hunt around for the link to get the app. Take them to the app, get them to download and walk them through the process.

******************************

Brain Quest Should Think Smarter About Using QR Codes

I have a 3yr old who loves the Brain Quest flash cards. For those not familiar, these are cards with questions that teach things like counting and spelling but also interesting stuff like the order of things (for example setting up a fish tank starts with putting in the plants, then adding water and finally adding the fish) where the cards ask you to put things in the right order.  They’re great.

image: Brain Quest Box

So when it came time to get a present for my son’s friend’s birthday I thought these would be great and headed down to Costco to get the same set my son has. After much rifling through the stacks of card decks I couldn’t find the ones I wanted. Looking at the box of a more advanced set, however, I noticed a QR code. With a small bit of hope I thought perhaps they have a site that can tell me where else I might buy these. Though, it does mention something about an app right above the code (Would the code lead to an app download?). Well, it was worth a shot at least.

image: Brain Quest QR code

I noticed the the designers at Workman Publishing – the creators of Brain Quest products – added their own design touches to the usually plain QR code. I’d recently done a webinar on 2D barcodes, which covers how and how not to add design to a QR code, so I was particularly interested in this code, which included a small cartoon and some colorful swirls.

So out came my Nexus S and with a swype and a tap I had i-Nigma running and I was ready to scan.

Scanning, scanning, scanning… Nothing! i-Nigma couldn’t read the code! Hmm. Rotating the box into better lighting didn’t seem to help, either. I tried another barcode scanner, Red Laser. Nope, didn’t work. Then I tried Scanlife, QuickMark and QR Droid. None of them worked. (Try it yourself and let me know if you are able to get a good scan.)

Disappointed in the failed code, I opened a browser on my phone and just went to the URL printed just under the code. Not surprisingly, it was not a mobile-friendly site but I was determined. After a very slow loading time and much panning and zooming – a painful experience to say the least – I was able to learn that the flash cards were also available down the street at Barnes and Noble. Sheesh.

Fail.

*************************************************

What could have saved this campaign?

In many ways this is like so many other failed QR efforts. But the fact that they used a custom designed code sets it apart and the campaign finds itself here on www.mobilemarketingfail.com.

Designer QR Code – Generally, I don’t recommend brands do much if any design alterations to QR codes. Only a minority of mobile phone users know what they are and what to do and the less they look like a QR code the less likely people are to engage. That said, QR codes come with a certain amount of error correction that allows the code to work even if parts of the all-important pixels are obscured. Unfortunately in this case the combination of the cartoon and the swirls rendered it unreadable. Had they simply done one or the other the code would work (I tested this by removing the swirls using an image editor).

Testing – I say this so often my eyes roll involuntarily when I do. So, once again, had this QR been tested prior to a full production run of packaging (by scanning the print proof) this could have been caught and fixed.

Instructions – QR codes in general are still not mainstream. Only smartphones are capable of it and less than 25% of smartphone holders scan codes. If you want to create engagement with the code you need to add instructions (learn more on how to use QR codes).

A Mobile-Friendly Experience – If a 2D barcode is directing to a web site, it had better be designed for mobile. If not, the scan will be the end of the engagement.

Central Security Distributors Not So Secure – FAIL

Any smartphone owner who’s downloaded a handful of apps will acknowledge the advertising that is present on most free apps. They are very much like banner ads on regular (i.e. non-mobile) web sites. And my guess is that they get about the same amount of intentional clicks, if not fewer. My personal theory is that mobile ads receive clicks (taps on a touch screen) because:
1) they are tapped accidentally,
2) new smartphone owners are tapping on things just to see how they work
These clicks are not from people truly interested in the product or service being promoted. Again, only a personal theory.

So, like many smartphone owners I’ve downloaded a free alarm clock app, which has ads. And true to my theory, I accidentally tapped this ad from CSD (Central Security Distributors) who apparently sells security systems from Paradox:

image: Paradox Security Mobile Ad

Here’s what I got. Keep in mind this is an offer for security products.

image: Paradox Security Mobile Ad Fail

Whoa! Wait a minute. A security warning on a site that sells security products? Yikes.

Fail #1.

If you look behind the certificate you’ll see the other, more common problem: a non-mobile web site. Even if I did continue in spite of the warning I’d be in for a terrible experience at a full web site that has shrunk itself to the size of my phone screen. No way.

Fail #2.

******************************************

What could have saved this campaign?

The problems with this campaign stem from, I believe, a single point of failure. This is an Adwords campaign. You can tell by the Google+ “+1″ stuff off to the left of the ad and the arrow that points to the right indicating that you will be going somewhere, which is Google’s way of letting you know you’ll be ‘taken somewhere.’

Here’s what happened: whoever set up the Adwords campaign for CSD didn’t realize that Adwords will automatically put your ad on mobile phones unless you specify otherwise (generally a bad move on Google’s part). Here’s what that looks like in the Adwords system:

image: Adwords Devices Options

The default is “All available devices” and is unfortunately recommended by Google. The marketer at CSD just accepted the default not realizing that any clicks from a mobile device would be 100% wasted due to the issues described above.

Aside from the issue of why the ad was on a mobile device is why the site has an invalid security certificate associated with the content on the site. This is just bad web programming and particularly egregious for a firm selling security products.

Oddly, a similar thing happened with American Express.

Pampers Tries SMS But Leaks Out Anyway

I hate diapers. On the one hand you need them to keep your baby clean and on the other hand they are filling up landfills and decompose slowly.  And the reminders come multiple times per day. Sure, we tried cloth diapers but you may not realize how much water and electricity you go through cleaning and drying these absorbent things.  It’s insane. I’m not convinced it’s worth it. I’m back to disposables.

Which leads me to Pampers. I was taking a shrink-wrapped bundle of them to the daycare when I noticed a sticker on the pack with a long number/code on it. I’m actually surprised it got my attention because the sticker was so small. Seemed almost like a packing or shipping label of some sort.

image:Pampers GTG Sticker

Turns out it was a Call-To-Action!

Naturally curious, I tried to read the thing. Ever try to read the text on a coin? It was about half that size. I needed my glasses. It was painfully small. Here’s what I saw:

image: Pampers GTG Sticker Closeup

I guess you could text the code in as part of some sort of rewards program. I’m not a ‘member’ but not knowing what else to do I forged on sending the 15-digit code to 726777.

Expecting to be told I’m not a ‘member’ I received the following message in return:
“Sorry, we couldn’t find your mobile number. Please enter your email address. Msg&data rates may apply. reply STOP 2 quit, HELP 4help & T&Cs”

Fine. I replied with my email address. Here’s the reply:
“Sorry, we could not find your email @ Pampers GTG. Please register at pampers.com. Msg&data rates may apply. reply STOP 2 quit, HELP 4help”

(wow, those CYA bits about data rates and stop and help are really annoying)

Really? I need to go to a ‘regular’ website to register? I’ve gone so far as to stop what I’m doing, locate my glasses, find my phone, send the code, send my email and now you bail on me? This site is not meant for mobile and requires all kinds of data entry. Forget it.

FAIL.

*****************************************************************************

What could have saved this campaign?

First, these stickers are way too small. I’m not a 20-something but I only got reading glasses in the last 4 months and rarely use them. I see fine in normal conditions. If you want people to participate, make it easy (maybe Pampers doesn’t really want participation?).

Second, follow MMA (Mobile Marketing Association) guidelines for promoting shortcode-based programs. This will keep you from being audited and subsequently shut off.

Third, allow people to sign up via mobile. Do NOT make them use your regular web site. People on their phones won’t type and confirm-type email addresses and passwords, fill in addresses and make a bunch of preferences selections. Let them sign up and then follow up with them (via email) if you want more info. This can be done on a mobile web site or using SMS. Contact Atomic Mobile to see how this might work.

iLoop Showcases Super8 Mobile Fail

I’ve been receiving promotional SMS messages from iLoop Mobile. Their “iLoop Market” program is intended to showcase mobile campaigns that iLoop thinks are good and interesting. Last week’s iLoop Market offering arrived on-time and on-schedule. Here’s what they like:

So far so good. I tap the url (http://super8.mtiny.mobi), which looks like it was made for mobile so my expectations start to rise (seriously, few sites are actually made for mobile). Here’s what I see as I hold my phone in the ‘normal’ (i.e., vertical) position:

Hmm. Made for mobile? Doesn’t look like it. I try rotating the phone to check the horizontal view – maybe it was made for a wider screen (e.g., iPad)?

Hmm. The sky and clouds. I scroll down to see the menu I already caught a glimpse of a second ago.

This is starting to look better. It fits the width of the screen nicely and doesn’t require any horizontal scrolling. Though, why I had to scroll down so far to see it I don’t know. Curious about the movie I tap the VIDEO link. I’m taken to a page with the word ‘TRAILER’ and an image. I try tapping the image. The screen flickers but nothing seems to be happening. I click again. Same. Then, I notice the notifications area on the top of my phone. Something appears to be downloading. Hmm. Ok. I open the notifications screen and see that I’m downloading two copies of a file with a HUGE name that ends in ‘.tv’. I’m assuming this is a trailer for the movie. I cancel one download and 8 minutes(!) later have a video to watch.

Notice the file size – more than 5 megabytes; they could have warned me.. This video is larger than most apps I’ve downloaded. Well, I waited long enough for the download, I look forward watching it. I tap the video and a very high quality video starts to play.

Problem is, I don’t hear anything. It is a silent trailer? I put my ear closer to the phone’s speaker and while I do hear something it is soooo quiet. I have to keep my ear so close to the phone that I can’t watch at the same time. The audio is also messed up somehow. The voices sound like they are under water. I can’t understand a word.

FAIL.

I go back to the web site and try tapping ‘UPDATES’. A page loads that asks for my phone number, email and birthdate.

They don’t really tell me what they propose to ‘update’ me on. Hmmm. I’m on a mobile phone so I guess they’ll send stuff to my phone but why do they want my email and birthdate? Reluctantly I enter the information (though I did shave a few years off the birthdate!), check the “I hereby certify” box and tap Submit. A largely blank page loads thanking me for signing up and assuring me I’ll be the first to know about all the latest news for Super8 (apparently things will be changing often). A minute or so later I receive a text-message from 33287:

Really? They want my date of birth? I JUST entered it into the web page along with my email and mobile number!  They already know my (fake) birthdate. I’m not doing this.

FAIL.

*****************************************************

What could have saved this campaign?

Well before we get into how this should be fixed I want to acknowledge that I received the url from iLoop Mobile and not from Paramount. I don’t know if Paramount intended for the URL to be accessed from anything other than an iPad, on which it works well. iLoop, however, should know better than to promote such a broken experience. Is this what their clients can expect? I’m just sayin’.

First, this site needs to fit the screen in the vertical position. This is the most natural and likely position from which someone will be clicking on the url from an SMS.

Second, the image of the sky and clouds is cool but this is mobile. Get me to the content without making me scroll down. The link menu on the web site should be ‘above the fold’.

Third, the font needs additional contrast. It’s dark grey over black and some of it is very, very small. Mobile – and the inherent variety of devices/screens – calls for something more crisp and easy to read.

Fourth, use a lower quality video, and stream it rather than download it to the device; space can be precious on mobile devices. This also helps you be data-plan friendly; not all users have unlimited data and 5mb is a good size chunk of a person’s data plan. If you insist on the high quality be sure to tell people up front. Video is a challenge in the mobile environment so be sure to test on many devices and networks.

Fifth, tell users what they are going to receive updates on and by what means. The subscription page asked for both mobile number and email address. What will be sent to these? Set a clear expectation here.

Sixth,  explain why you want – and require – a birthdate. Blatant and unexplained solicitation of data creates suspicion, particularly in a personal medium like mobile.

Seventh, connect the databases. The subscription page required a mobile number and a birthdate. The resulting SMS should reflect that knowledge and NOT ask for birthdate again. It should simply thank the person for subscribing and ask them to confirm by replying with “YES” or “OK”.

Eighth, test the program on multiple devices. This one worked ok on an iPad using WiFi but completely broke down on an Android phone using 3G service.

Alaska Airlines SMS Offer FAIL

Not long ago I signed up to receive text-message promotions and offers from Alaska Airlines. I like Alaska Air. They are probably my favorite airline and I fly them whenever I can. They also seem to recognize the needs of a mobile traveler (is that redundant? does travel = mobile?) because they have smartphone apps, a mobile web site, and offer flight alerts via SMS.

Their latest SMS promotion said the following:

Mildly interesting, I guess, but I immediately have a series of thoughts.

  1. Why do I need to register? Wouldn’t I just get the credit?
  2. I’m probably not going to book a trip just because I can get double miles. Does this incentive really drive new bookings?
  3. Is this offer only good for today or the next few hours?

With my head filling with more questions than answers I click on the url and my (smart) phone browser displays:

(life-size image)

Ouch. What the heck is this? It appears to be a page on their main web site that is almost completely filled with text that is far too small to read. Even when I zoom in to the point where the type is legible it means I need to pan side-to-side in order to read a complete line.  I’m not doing this. It will be far too painful.

I do, however, scroll to the bottom to see just how long this page is and I find a couple form fields. One asks for my mileage plan number (don’t they already have it?) and the other asks where I heard about this offer, presumably in an effort to track the effectiveness of different channels at driving people to the offer. Zooming way in I tap the selector and there isn’t an option to say I heard about the offer via text-message.  This SMS effort appears to be an afterthought.

FAIL.

*****************************************************************************

What could have saved this campaign?

To put it mildly, there is a lot of room for improvement here. Let’s start at the beginning with the SMS message and work our way through.

The main issue with the SMS is that it doesn’t conform to the standards of the Mobile Marketing Association’s Consumer Best Practices. Any broadcast message like this needs to have opt-out verbiage such as “reply STOP to cancel msgs”.  This is not only a rule it is the right thing to do for the recipient.

Next is the landing page. It wasn’t designed for mobile viewing and is almost a guaranteed poor user experience. It would not have been difficult or expensive to build a single mobile landing page that displays the details of the offer, the terms, and an entry form to capture registrations. Using a non-mobile page will significantly impact participant opt-out rates (assuming you’ve told them how to opt-out). The odd thing here is that Alaska Airlines has a mobile site at m.alaskaair.com.

Finally, Alaska Air should be holding mobile marketing efforts to a higher standard of accountability. I’m pretty sure that they can’t track anything associated with this effort.

  1. They are using a vanity bit.ly url which will only tell you the number of clicks. It won’t allow you to carry through recipient information like mobile number or even the mileage plan number. They will never know who actually clicked.
  2. They are gathering user-reported source info but not including SMS as one of the options. They will probably never know if the SMS generated any registrations.

TIME Magazine Frames a FAIL

A recent post by ChinWonder had me trying yet another QR code. The code didn’t work for her so I thought it may be a FAIL worth talking about.  Well, the QR code worked for me but here’s what I found instead.

The Time Frames project is a web-based effort to organize history into some broad categories, or frames, through which you can explore related content from the TIME

image:Time Mag pop-up ad

Pop-Up Ad

archives.  Not a bad idea, I guess.  That is, until you try it on your mobile phone. It’s true, the site does load, though verrry slowly and not before a pop-up ad that is also too big for

the screen. Who knows how much of my mobile data plan is being chewed up by an image-rich site that is designed for broadband Internet users?

Panning across and up and down the site is a neat trick enabled by the touch screen on my phone the technique makes it hard to understand how, exactly, the page is organized. I tried zooming out to fit the whole site on the screen but then the text was impossible to read so I had to zoom back in and continue panning. As I do this, however, I notice a blank space with the notice, “We’re sorry. HTML5 players are currently not enabled for this account.” Huh? Who’s account?image:Time Mag Bad HTML Player What is an HTML5 player anyway? Something is broken there. There are also several flash elements on the page that are trying to load (and never will on iPhones) with intermittent success. Disregarding these I selected an article on Pope John Paul II from 1984 and the slow page-loading process started again. Sigh.

This time I scroll all the way to the bottom of the page just to see exactly how big this page is (I don’t have much patience for long articles).  It isn’t terribly long but there is a page counter that says I’m on page one of eight. Forget it. But wait! At the bottom of the page is a little box with an image of a mobile phone that says, “Read TIME Mobile on Your Phone.” Yay! A mobile version! Click. Wait. Wait some more. I’m taken to another non-mobile web page with the header ‘TIMEMobile’ and five tabs, one each for Android, iPad, iPhone, Blackberry and Mobile Site. Not being a big app fan I select the Mobile Site. The page loads – quicker this time, which is promising – and now the new sub headline says,

image: Time Mobile

TIMEMobile

“mobile.time.com The easy way to access Time.com from your smartphone.” Ok.. I was really just expecting to go right to the mobile site but it appears the editors at TIME want me to click one more time. Fine. I try clicking the big, red ‘mobile.time.com’ and…nothing. It’s not a link. I can’t click anywhere on the page to actually get to the mobile site! They have a mobile site and I can’t even get to it without typing it into my phone’s browser.

I’m done. FAIL.

**********************************************************************

What might have saved this campaign?
Between spotty QR scanning success and the lack of access to the mobile site this campaign is in pretty tough shape.  At the very heart of TIME magazine’s problem here is that they are not recognizing mobile devices that access their site and providing a device-appropriate experience. Layered on top of that are efforts like Time Frames that don’t create a mobile version yet encourage access via mobile device. Perhaps the Time Frames team should read this.
Time needs a more strategic approach to mobile and really re-think their web experience with mobile at the center rather than mobile as an add-on. All project teams need to be in sync on this. In addition, they need to test the user experience from a variety of devices and ask themselves if broken video players and flash elements are acceptable and in keeping with their brand; I suspect it isn’t.

REI Fail #2 – Make It Stop

Someone please call REI. Whoever is running their mobile marketing is asleep.image: REI SKI Magazine ad

We’re coming up on ski season and skiers and boarders alike will be keeping a close eye on snow conditions.  REI is presumably here to help. In the new issue of SKI Magazine REI placed a full-page ad dedicated largely to their equipment servicing offer but for those with iPhone and Android-based phones they have a bonus: a free snow report app!

Using a nice, short URL, REI.com/apps, they successfully avoided the inherent challenges with QR codes (i.e., some people don’t know what they are and don’t have a reader installed on their phone). This tidy little URL can easily be typed into a phone browser, which is what I did. Soon the now-familiar REI image: REI Ad Copymobile site began loading. After a few seconds the site was loaded and – no app anywhere. I wasn’t even on a page that was supposed to have apps. I was just staring at the front door of their mobile site.

Fail.

Looking around, I didn’t even see where the apps might be. Under ‘SHOP’? Under ‘Find Out’? Checking….. nope. I don’t see it anywhere. On an off-chance I thought I’d try the URL from my computer and there – on the fixed Internet – is a page offering an iPhone app. Yay! But what about Android? Oop. In pretty orange letters the page says, “Android Version Coming Soon!” I could have swore the ad said for iPhone and Android. Wait! It did. Fail again. Sigh.

Credit: @daniel_phelps

*************************************************************

What might have saved this campaign?
At some risk of stating the obvious REI could have simply created a page on their mobile site where the app(s) could be downloaded. When their web servers detected that a mobile device was accessing REI.com/apps the user could be taken directly to that page. As far as promoting an app for Android when none exists? This bad idea could be mitigated by offering to alert me via SMS when the app is ready. Then send me the link to the download page.

MLB and SU2C.org FAIL

From Meg Brown:

Stand Up To Cancer, an initiative to accelerate cancer research, sponsored the opening game of the MLB World Series tonight. They bought major ad time during the game that encouraged viewers to join in the movement and take a stand by launching a star in honor of someone you love who has been affected by cancer. “For as little as a dollar you can make a difference.”

The URL, www.SU2C.org, is short and sweet. It is perfect for a captured audience. They are at the game… with their phones. They are sitting at their local bar… with their phones. They are sitting on their couch… with their phones. Will someone PLEASE tell me why this website was not optimized for mobile devices? No one from MLB or Stand Up To Cancer realized that this website would crash every phone that tried to access it while watching image: SU2C mobile webthe game. Seriously?

A word of advice to all the marketers out there: Talk to your IT department before shelling out millions of dollars on a media buy that will FAIL.

Kelly: I guess it’s not like they tried to use mobile and failed. Rather they just failed to recognize mobile.

****************************************************************

What could have saved this campaign?
It may be obvious that the SU2C.org web site should have been prepared for access from mobile devices but I’ll state that first. Part of these preparations could have included a clear mobile web strategy that supports the SU2C overall objectives of driving donations and involvement (the mobile web is probably not a place to push TV viewership as they do from their main web site). Then, construct a (non-flash) mobile site that recognizes the context of the mobile game-watcher (in the stands, on the couch, in a bar). Finally, detect the mobile device and redirect them to the mobile site.
Also, with such a captive audience they might have used SMS to encourage $5 on-the-spot donations.

REI Fail

From Meg Brown:

One of the primary challenges faced by the majority of brand marketers today is how to effectively integrate rapidly evolving technology advancements into their marketing plans. What happens when a marketing team is charged with facilitating deadlines with their mobile Agency of Record, their internal IT department and their direct mail printer?  image: REI FlyerUnfortunately, it can be a recipe for a huge marketing failure.

For example, REI’s Fall Sales catalogue arrived in my mail yesterday. On the back of the mailer there is a large, bright orange coupon advertising 20% one full-priced item. To the right of that coupon, in much smaller and non-descript print, there is a QR code. This is a not a strong call to action for the mobile campaign when placed right next to the bright coupon. Plus, I do not think the average consumer automatically recognizes that the QR code is intended for them. Due to the placement it could easily be confused as a tool for the  Postal Carrier.

One thing that REI did right was clearly explaining how to download a QR reader to “watch the magic happen”.  Nice. Where did they go wrong? Well, when I scanned the code it took me to a page with an error message. The page informed me, “We are making updates to the mobile site. Please view our store locator on the REI.com HTML site.”  The mobile site was down for maintenance on the very day that they launched the mobile campaign.image: REI Site Down

Huge Fail.

Imagine the typical consumer experience.

  1. Placement of the QR code was a huge miss because it is competing with the bright coupon.
  2. Weak call to action because it isn’t tied to an offer, just a store location (finder).
  3. Majority of consumers don’t have a QR scanner and if they do they aren’t aware of it.
  4. A small percentage will actually take the time to go into the app store and download a QR scanner.
  5. Consumer scans code and the site is down.

Kelly: The whole thing is so underwhelming and would be even if the site was up. Store locator? Really? What REI member does not know the location of their nearest 3 REI stores?

********************************************************************

What could have saved this campaign?
Besides stating the obvious way that they could improve this mobile campaign (working mobile site), there are other ways to set this up for success in the future.

  1. Give the consumer a better pay off. Tie the QR code to a compelling offer with a time restrictions. For example, bring this into the store in the next 24hrs for 25% off any full priced item or even, get the coupon to the left sent to your cell phone now.
  2. Give the QR code prominent placement. Don’t place it next to all of the Post Carrier messaging. Put it on the inside cover with an eye-catching explanation.
  3. Provide an SMS option to retrieve the URL and link to the mobile web site.

Marketing departments need to learn that they can’t implement the newest technology into their media plan unless they have developed a clear strategy with their IT department.